NEWSLETTER 05.10.15

Horticulture & Cropping
Don’t relax, the frosts could still hit. That’s the warning from Jim Grierson who says the spring has hit at last and we are in for “an even flowering” but the threat of frosts is very strong. He says the nights are still cold enough to promote frosts if the wind drops and the skies clear.  

California thistles are bad this year and you are advised to get onto them quickly. Jim Grierson says hit them with your herbicide as soon as the first leaves fallflat against the ground as that is when they are most susceptible to sprays.  

Residues are something everyone MUST be careful about. Jim says the best way to ensure you are OK is simply talk with your consultants and advisers and read the labels. He admits that growers should also talk with the exporters to ensure everyone is moving in the same direction. (Watch Interview)

Innovation & Technology
You don’t have to worry about losing your gear if you take precautions and there’s a new simple devise that will do it for you. TL Parker have launched a gizmo that activates your cell phone, I Pad or computer whenever the machine the device is attached to moves. It then tracks the machine or vehicle so the Police can take charge. Dave Dredge from TL Parker says it doubles as a safety devise because farmers can see where their staff are at any one time if they are using vehicles with the device attached. (Watch Interview)

Community
Location is not a restriction as Jessica Gunn can assure you. She is running an international art business from a farm in North Canterbury. She says she sells her art all over the world through her website despite the fact the property she and her husband runs is tucked under the Southern Alps. Jessica says modern communication means you are just a click away from selling your products to the world. (Watch Interview)

Canterbury has the best braided rivers in the world, but motorbikes and hoons invehicles are killing off some of the world’s most endangered birds breeding in them. Steve Attwood says there are five species of birds in particular that breed in braided river beds and human interference is killing the last of them off. He says theother problem is cats, rats stoats and other predators that are also devastating the numbers. He says some farmers that have braided rivers flowing through their properties are actively trapping predators in a move to help preserve the birds. (Watch Interview)

Irrigation by RX Plastics
Flow is the most important part of making a weeping wall work. Tony Atwool from RX Plastics says the pond must be long enough to enable the liquid to move slowly rather than flowing freely for the solids to settle and the wall not block up. He says it is vital if you want your wall to work. The more energy in the flow, the less chance of the system working. (Watch Interview)

Education by Lincoln University
The rural town being there as a service centre for the local farmers may soon be a thing of the past. Michael Shone from Lincoln University says rural towns are now becoming centres for local producers to sell their fares and are acting as tourism attractions. He says many small towns such as Geraldine and Methven have totally changed over the past couple of decades and more will follow. (Watch Interview)

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